Have you ever considered vehicle regression? - Page 11
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  1. #101
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    My early 60's Rambler station wagon was purchased for 100 bucks. The windshield wiper motor gave out and I knew of a Rambler that was at least five years it's senior that had been abandoned on an old dirt road. A few minutes after helping myself to the donor vehicle I had functioning wipers again. I worked part time at the YMCA while going to school. I got out after work one night and to my surprise the brake pedal went to the floor. I had to get a lift home and change out the rusted rear brake line the next day in the rain in the parking lot.
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  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonrjen View Post
    My first car was a 1963 Plymouth Valiant with the slant six 225 motor and push button transmission. I made mention of this in an earlier post. What I didn't share that this was the beginning or my learning of vehicle mechanics

    I was 15 years old when I purchased the car and still had 6 months before I could get my drivers license. Which was fine because the car needed to be cleaned up, needed a tune up, and new brakes all the way around. And I didn't know squat about doing any of this work myself. Well, mom worked part time as a secretary at the TWA repair facility located at what is now MCI International Airport in KC, MO. She actually worked for GE in conjunction with Rolls Royce who supplied engines and parts for jets.

    So Mom would ask the mechanics who worked on the big jet engines how to do the work I needed to do. She would then come home and the two of us would get under the hood of that little Valiant and proceed to get to work. We popped off the distributor cap and dug in to replacing the points, rotor and condenser. Figured out adjusting the points and greasing up the lobe. We changed spark plugs and wires doing them one at a time as to not cross any wires and throwing of the firing order. I learned that the spark of a bad spark plug wire hurt big time, and mom learned to have a good laugh at my expense.

    Later we moved on to doing brakes on all four corners and learned that kitty litter is great at soaking up brake fluid after bleeding brake lines on concrete. We even got to replace a master cylinder booster together. We amazed Dad many times at what we could fix and the mess we could make.

    Miss you Mom,
    Another one of those GREAT personal stories that makes TA.net such a special place.
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  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonrjen View Post
    Has a body line that almost screams, Prisoner Transport or Armored Car. Maybe a hint of military medical Korean War era.
    ......or Partridge Family.
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  5. #104
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    I have a garage full of automotive tools that I don't HAVE to use anymore, precisely because of advancements in automotive technology. I don't consider that a bad thing. Don't like heated seat or cell phone tech in your car. Don't buy it.

    If you really want something simpler;

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  6. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ickthus View Post
    I use too sit inside on the fender flair and set the points on the 1969 Ford long wheel base straigh 300 six of my dads truck. The same model used by Charles Bronson in Mr. Mejestyk.
    The distributor cap sat just above the exhaust intake manifold even with the valve cover. You could roll the fan belt off with a screw driver and drive though high water with the truck. So high that water was almost covering the seat! I tried my best to kill that truck every weekend. It could take it.
    My first car was a 62 Victoria Club Coupe with a 390 Interceptor, and it kept me broke, particularly with trasmission repairs.

    In 1968, I bought a new F-100 long wheel base new. It was the plainest wrapper F-100 Ford made. Painted bumpers and wheels, black rubber flooring, 300 straight 6, 4 speed with granny gear, no radio, no power anything, but I was able to drive it 50,000 miles in four years with no problems at all. Changed the plugs about every 10,000 and the oil every 3,000. No head turner at all, but it served my purpose, which at age 19-23, it wasn't a hot rod, and wasn't hot roded and made for a spartan money saver.

    I think I paid $1,871.00 for it in 1968 plus a $50 rear bumper. I considered a 68 El Camino with the small V-8, but decided I would hot rod it also. The El Camino was about $2,300 if I remember correctly. In hindsight, I would have been happier with the El Camino.
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  7. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by kschilk View Post
    A few weeks ago, I had a 3500 come in with misfires and low power. Three codes were set, one for the MAF sensor, one for the electronic throttle body (about $200 and $350 respectively, not incl labor) and one for multiple misfires. It was actually the accelerator pedal, which contains one of the two throttle position sensors. It cost about $65 and took about 2-3 minutes to install, though I did have about an hour in diagnostics to verify the real problem. With just a code reader, I could've blown $550+ replacing good parts with new and still be right where I'd started. On newer cars, almost every system and subsystem has its own module with its own set of codes so the codes you pull are becoming more specific but still, the code it throws isn't necessarily the source of the problem, often it's just a symptom. On that particular truck, there was a specific code for the pedal sensor but that's not the code it set. In mechanical terms......the pedal sensor got sick and threw-up on the throttle body and MAF sensor so they went cryin' to mom.

    Hmmm... I don't think the throttle cable on the AMX has a sensor... I'd better take another look, just in case.
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  8. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by GhostHorse View Post
    Okay, I... wow. Yeah, that sums it up nicely. Wow.
    Ever go to a car show and view a vehicle that is so stunning, there is simply nothing you can say???

    That just happened.
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  9. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJS3 View Post
    I have a garage full of automotive tools that I don't HAVE to use anymore, precisely because of advancements in automotive technology. I don't consider that a bad thing. Don't like heated seat or cell phone tech in your car. Don't buy it.

    If you really want something simpler;

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    I don't mind superfluous gadgets in cars so long as I'm not FORCED to buy them. I don't do bluetooth since I don't talk on the phone much. I'm retired and don't have that many good friends that need talking to while I'm driving. If I get a call, I just call it back when I get where I'm going. I don't need sensors all around me, either, since I have mirrors and eyes that work, now. Might have been handy before I got my cataracts fixed.

    Simple is better for me and I don't appreciate having technology forced upon me that I don't need. Some improvements, like electronic ignition, are nice, but some just make it so I cannot figure out problems on my truck or car. Gotta replace black boxes to fix anything and they're expensive. Now days, I just take it to the shop to be diagnosed. I have a good auto repair shop 20 miles from me, which is next door when any place you want to go is at LEAST 5 miles and more'n likely 20 or even 40.
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  10. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rook49 View Post
    Ah yes who didn't enjoy replacing their points, condenser and spark plugs every 15 to 20 thousand miles. I even miss that old leaky water pump that people tried to plug up the hole that water leaked from. And who didn't like putting new brushes in their generator at about 25,000 miles. Nothing like those old radiators that would rot out by 30,000 miles. Even when adding that jar of BAR's stop leak that looked like rabbit pellets it would still leak. What I really miss is the vacuum windshield wipers on the really old cars that would hardly move going up a hill in hard rain but would beat the window trim off the windshield going down the hill they were moving so fast. I also have fond memories of beating on the side of my carburetor with a hammer to get the float unstuck. That is until I hit it so hard I knocked a hole in the side of the carburetor on my '64 Mercury Comet. And for a really wild ride how about when that motor mount on the drivers side breaks and the motor rotates up and shoves the accelerator rod to the carburetor wide open. That gets real exciting in traffic. Yeah those were the good old days who don't miss that?
    I think it ultimately boils down to the "memories" of the simplicity of those vehicles. The times in our life that matched the significance of what we drove, and vice-versa.
    I don't know of many vehicles from the 50s, 60s, or 70s that would go 100,000 miles between tune-ups or having to be tuned at all. I mean... Think about how many car engines lasted 100k without blowing oil, leaking oil, or ticking, knocking, whatever. I'm unaware of many motors back then that could produce 100 hp per liter, unless race prepped. If engines were that efficient back then, a 68' Camaro with a 350 would have been making almost 575 hp from the factory and a 440 Cuda, 725 horsepower. Now let's talk MPGs. Old cars are great for nostalgia, a Saturday morning (or evening) spirited cruise, or something to custodian over for no better reason than, pride.

    But when we're picking-up others to go out for the evening, were taking something 2006 or newer. We wanna' get there, without having to repair a stuck choke plate.
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  11. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreatViews View Post
    It's a 360, 4 speed. By today's standards, it's a dog. But for back then it was considered fast.
    That's a good looking car right there!
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