Does anyone still read anymore (Books! I mean BOOKS!) - Page 6
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Thread: Does anyone still read anymore (Books! I mean BOOKS!)

  1. #51
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    Anytime I think I work to hard to make a living I read one of the books about the logging crews in the 1700's to 1930's.
    These old boys worked their rears off. Makes my job a piece of cake.
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  2. #52
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    I do every evening. I love 💕 to read.
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  3. #53
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    I used to be an avid reader in the extreme, but these days I probably read a book once every month or two. I had a massive library on book shelves that ran the length of a wall floor to ceiling, but carting such things around every time we moved (which was every few years), got to be a nightmare and I discovered the Kindle. SciFi, fantasy, horror, action, history, science, was (and still is) mostly how I spent my time.
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  5. #54
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    These days, most of my reading happens when I can't avoid flying. But I was a voracious reader for years. I learned FAR more in high school from the books I chose than I ever did from my teachers.

    Best commentaries on human nature:
    The Martian Chronicles, by Ray Bradbury; profound and beautifully moving, especially the chapter about a guy driving to a party late at night.
    On Killing, by Dave Grossman

    Best biography: Peter the Great, by Robert K Massie

    Best political lessons:
    The Gulag Archipelago by Alexander Solzynetsin
    The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein
    Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, although this has more literary shortcomings than all the rest of this list put together
    1984 by George Orwell; there are quite a few in America today who should give Animal Farm a good read too.

    Best writing about the military:
    Soldier of the Great War by Mark Helprin
    The Killer Angels Michael Shaara
    The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
    We Were Soldiers Once, and Young by Harold G Moore

    Best historical novel: Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett

    Best just-for-the-joy-of-the-tale books:
    The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings - there is deeper meaning there too, of course

    Not sure where to categorize them, but very much worth mentioning:

    The Foundation Trilogy by Asimov
    Mark Twain; amazing writer in so many ways
    Shakespeare's understanding of human nature is amazing
    Jack London, for the love of nature and the wild outdoors
    Umberto Eco; the Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana is a very unique, creative book, and most of what he writes is great

    I'm sure I'll think of a lot more once I post this, but that's probably enough for the now.
    Last edited by GhostHorse; 04-07-2019 at 10:01 AM.
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  6. #55
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    Since many folks around here seem to be over the hill and into SciFi, might I recommend "Old Mans War" by John Scalzi. It's the first in a series, but it holds up just fine as a stand alone novel and is quite an enjoyable read.
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  7. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddogg View Post
    Anytime I think I work to hard to make a living I read one of the books about the logging crews in the 1700's to 1930's.
    These old boys worked their rears off. Makes my job a piece of cake.
    I'd say coal mining, but that's just because of family history.

    But there's a profound point here. Think you're having a bad day? Read "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" and tell me you're having a bad day. Read about the siege of Leningrad or life in Andersonville prison and tell me you're having a bad day. This is why I absolutely can't take Emo or grunge or all these modern American self-pity "movements" as anything but pathetic self indulgence. One of the lessons of history for a modern American can be summed up in the word "gratitude."
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    "It is wonderful, in the event of a street fight, how few bullets seem to hit the men they are aimed at." Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, Theodore Roosevelt, 1888

  8. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by GhostHorse View Post
    These days, most of my reading happens when I can't avoid flying. But I was a voracious reader for years. I learned FAR more in high school from the books I chose than I ever did from my teachers.

    Best commentaries on human nature:
    The Martian Chronicles, by Ray Bradbury; profound and beautifully moving, especially the chapter about a guy driving to a party late at night.
    On Killing, by Dave Grossman

    Best biography: Peter the Great, by Robert K Massie

    Best political lessons:
    The Gulag Archipelago by Alexander Solzynetsin
    The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein
    Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, although this has more literary shortcomings than all the rest of this list put together
    1984 by George Orwell; there are quite a few in America today who should give Animal Farm a good read too.

    Best writing about the military:
    Soldier of the Great War by Mark Helprin
    The Killer Angels Michael Shaara
    The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
    We Were Soldiers Once, and Young by Harold G Moore

    Best historical novel: Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett

    Best just-for-the-joy-of-the-tale books:
    The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings - there is deeper meaning there too, of course

    Not sure where to categorize them, but very much worth mentioning:

    The Foundation Trilogy by Asimov
    Mark Twain; amazing writer in so many ways
    Shakespeare's understanding of human nature is amazing
    Jack London, for the love of nature and the wild outdoors
    Umberto Eco; the Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana is a very unique, creative book, and most of what he writes is great

    I'm sure I'll think of a lot more once I post this, but that's probably enough for the now.
    I recently read Rise to Rebellion by Jeff Shaara. Is Michael Shaara related?

  9. #58
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    I own a Ford truck, I have to read.....it is called the Chilton Auto Repair Manual
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  10. #59
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    Mystery novels, detective, adventure. Brad Thor, Brad Taylor, C.J. Box, Lee Child, Robert Crais, Michael Connelly, John Sandford, Clive Cussler, Doug Preston/Lincoln Child, Mark Greaney, Stephen Coonts, David Baldacci, Stephen Hunter, VinceFlynn, Robert B Parker.
    In no particular order.
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