Will gun smiths be a thing of the past? - Page 5
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Thread: Will gun smiths be a thing of the past?

  1. #41
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    Directory of Florida Gunsmiths

    The link claims to be a directory of gunsmiths in Florida. One called Ambush Gunsmithing in Sunrise Florida near Fort Lauderdale advertises comprehensive services on rifles. See: https://www.yellowpages.com/search?s...ation_terms=FL

    --Paul S


    Quote Originally Posted by Fishinkeylargo View Post
    Gun smiths seem hard to find these days. Places that offer gun smith services often turn out to be just glorified gun cleaners or parts changers on MSR's.

    Off and on I have been looking for a gunsmith to fix a Marlin Model 57M Levermatic rifle. It will not feed cartridges properly. Suspect it is a bad lifter or lifter spring as the cartridge just falls short of going into the chamber. I have talked to several "Gun Smiths" in S. Florida and no one will commit to working on it. Had one tell me to bring it in, when I got there he changed his mind.

    Makes me wonder if young people are just not becoming gun smiths if we will have any in years to come.

    Starting to look for another Gun Smith again as i really do want to get it fixed.
    Last edited by daytonaredeye; 05-14-2020 at 09:17 AM. Reason: Formatted the quoted post
    Fishinkeylargo likes this.

  2. #42
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    There is a Youtube series called C&Rsenal that occasionally has a gunsmithing video showing what their gunsmith calls home project smithing. I remember one two part series on restoring antique military rifles without altering them and ruining their historical value. At the end of one process, restoring the original finish, he made the statement that most gunsmiths would not want to do the work. They would have to charge a whole lot more than the rifle is worth, for the time they were spending on the firearm. I think this is probably the reason you won't be able to find a gunsmith to do the work for you. It's more profitable to just change a part than to troubleshoot and possibly have to fabricate a replacement part. If a gunsmith did take in an older rifle and had to spend a lot of time on it, the owner might retch at the price to fix it, and to be sure, there is no way to know how much time you're going to have to spend on it. Pawpa's heirloom Winchester might have a lot of sentimental value until you realize you can get two for what you're going to have to pay to fix it.
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  3. #43
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    The gunsmithing industry is a lot smaller since the firearms companies started mass-producing plastic garbage with drop-in parts. Oh, well. That's "progress!"
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  5. #44
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    The gunsmith industry is changing with the times, like above newer guns require less experienced gunsmiths, but need more parts and accessory swappers. There will always be a niche for 1911 and revolver gunsmiths. Now if you tube deletes all the gunsmithing videos , then we may see an increase in brick and mortar gunsmithing.
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  6. #45
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    Three young graduates from the Colorado School of Trades Gunsmithing program ($30k) opened a shop near me. They were only open a couple months when we were all told to go home and hide under our beds. They did not immediately have the cash for the new CNC mill, lathe, and other expensive tools they needed. They started doing custom Cerakoting and selling pistols, ARs and automatic knives. If they can survive this virus induced economic downturn maybe they can afford the machines that would allow them to be real gunsmiths. I'm pulling for 'em.

  7. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by GerSan69 View Post
    The gunsmithing industry is a lot smaller since the firearms companies started mass-producing plastic garbage with drop-in parts. Oh, well. That's "progress!"
    The US Navy issued polymer framed handguns to members of its Underwater Demolition Teams in World War II. An example of such a firearm can be found at the Navy SEALs Museum in Ft. Pierce, Florida. Mass produced Polymer handguns been around for about 60 years . The first synthetic polymer was invented in 1907 and patented in 1909. My first polymer firearm was a CZ P-07 ....one of the best I own. "Plastic Garbage" has been around for many more years than most people think.
    Czechbikr likes this.
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  8. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sekol View Post
    Insurance for running a gunsmith business is one of the main reason it's not a cost effective business....unfortunately.


    Yeah not only the insurance but if you replace parts, fit parts, buy a receiver and all parts and assemble technically you have to pay a yearly ITAR fee which I think last I checked is $2,350 a year. I contacted the ATF to get some clarification on the ITAR registration and fee and this is the info I was given. I have also talked to gunsmiths around the country most pay the fee.
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  9. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark7mod0 View Post
    The US Navy issued polymer framed handguns to members of its Underwater Demolition Teams in World War II. An example of such a firearm can be found at the Navy SEALs Museum in Ft. Pierce, Florida. Mass produced Polymer handguns been around for about 60 years . The first synthetic polymer was invented in 1907 and patented in 1909. My first polymer firearm was a CZ P-07 ....one of the best I own. "Plastic Garbage" has been around for many more years than most people think.
    All technically true, but you've omitted the fact that polymer guns were unknown in the general marketplace until Glock came along. No, Glock wasn't the first, but polymer guns' market share was so small you could ignore it until a certain Austrian decided to chase a government contract.

    Calling them garbage is an overstatement IMHO, but they are utilitarian. Firearms produced in huge quantities for the Armies of 1900-1910 or in the 1930s show more workmanship, care, and pride of craft than even a small run polymer gun. And that's saying nothing of firearms of the same eras that were made for sale to civilians. Here are my 1916 pre-Woodsman, 1929 .25ACP, and PT740.

    Name:  Colts and PT740.jpeg
Views: 16
Size:  133.4 KB

    There are certainly practical benefits to using polymer. But there's a solidity and strength to steel or even aluminum that polymer just can't match. That pre-Woodsman is now 104 years old. It shoots like new.
    "It is wonderful, in the event of a street fight, how few bullets seem to hit the men they are aimed at." Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, Theodore Roosevelt, 1888

  10. #49
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    I am a gunsmith, long story short, there is NO money in it!
    You can buy a new firearm for the cost of simple smithing........................
    There are "four boxes" that can be employed to resist the downfall of America, the ballot box, the soap box, the jury box and, lastly, the ammo box.

  11. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by GhostHorse View Post
    You, sir, have earned yourself a holster. Send me a PM.
    Dear Mr. Peacemakr, sir: If you haven't contacted GH about that holster yet, you are missing a once-in-a-lifetime offer. I have his handmade holsters for an EAA Windicator, a Ruger Super Blackhawk, a 1911, and also a custom knife sheath. The man has a day job, but his true calling and talent is leather work. If you haven't sent that PM, do it. If you did send it - you're in for a treat.
    Every man should own a fine firearm, a fine knife and a fine watch.

 

 
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