Father Facing Felony Charges After Shooting Two Men Attempting to Kidnap His Son - Page 5
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Thread: Father Facing Felony Charges After Shooting Two Men Attempting to Kidnap His Son

  1. #41
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    He did what he had to do to save his son. Since the gun was "modified" he'll have to face charges for it. He might not even be the "owner" of the weapon, it could have belonged to the family member whose house he was at. The story is pretty sketchy, but I think there is a good chance that unless he's pulled the trigger before, and pending federal charges, he'll get a slap on the wrist.
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  2. #42
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    I think that anti gun groups are pushing for so many things to be a felony that we will eventually be gun free by default. I’ll bet no one ever thought that this back door scheme was a way to get gun control. At the same time they are releasing prisoners by the boat load because of cost.
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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by 230JHP View Post
    When recidivism rates get low, I might start listening to the, ‘poor felons deserve to get their rights back,’ plea.

    But since recidivism rates are over 80%, I don’t have time for that.
    Many (myself included) would argue the current system of lifetime stigma is the very reason recidivism is so high. If the current system actually worked then recidivism would be low. It doesn't, and it isn't.

    From what I can find, I think his felony conviction was for marijuana. I have no sympathy for him, he chose to break the law. Even if I disagree with the law. Getting arrested isn't the same as getting convicted. We'll have to see what happens to him from here.
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  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by rago View Post
    I think that anti gun groups are pushing for so many things to be a felony that we will eventually be gun free by default. I’ll bet no one ever thought that this back door scheme was a way to get gun control. At the same time they are releasing prisoners by the boat load because of cost.
    B I N G O

    Give that man a cookie.

    Those who are not felons, will be ruled "a danger". Either way, very few (elites) will be allowed to have guns.

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by RScottie View Post
    Upon conviction, they only lose their rights while incarcerated. Once freed, all rights are restored.
    Please provide citation to the constitutional text in question, because I don't remember that being in there.

    Quote Originally Posted by CJS3 View Post
    He might not even be the "owner" of the weapon, it could have belonged to the family member whose house he was at.
    Even if he's not the owner, he's still violating the law by picking up someone else's firearm. The felony prohibition laws typically include possession, which is a lower bar than ownership. Even our laws aren't stupid enough not to see the "It's actually my wife's gun" defense coming.
    "It is wonderful, in the event of a street fight, how few bullets seem to hit the men they are aimed at." Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, Theodore Roosevelt, 1888

  7. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by 230JHP View Post
    When recidivism rates get low, I might start listening to the, ‘poor felons deserve to get their rights back,’ plea.

    But since recidivism rates are over 80%, I don’t have time for that.
    This is really like the old joke:

    "The floggings will continue until morale improves".

    When they've lost the possibility of getting a REAL job and having a REAL life what are they expected to do.

    I knew of a company here in North Carolina that hired primarily convicted felons. Why? Because they could
    pay them peanut shells and treat them like dirt because they really didn't have anywhere else they could go.
    These guys were really little more than modern day slaves. It was some heavy, dirty, dangerous work they
    were doing. No one complained though. When it's ALL YOU HAVE you don't rock the boat.

    All the Best,
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  8. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by GhostHorse View Post
    Please provide citation to the constitutional text in question, because I don't remember that being in there.



    Even if he's not the owner, he's still violating the law by picking up someone else's firearm. The felony prohibition laws typically include possession, which is a lower bar than ownership. Even our laws aren't stupid enough not to see the "It's actually my wife's gun" defense coming.

    Nothing I've seen in the US Constitution describes loss of rights upon conviction of a Felony crime. The only reference I've seen that's firearm specific is 18 USC 922 paragraph G which was implemented in 1968 as part of the GCA.
    As an aside to that, 18 USC 922 does pretty much indicate that gun "buy back" programs are Federally illegal. It's worth really reading over. Oddly enough though, from the federal perspective, it only deals with interstate transactions. If a Felon in say Texas buys a firearm completely made in Texas and uses ammunition made in Texas, 18 USC 922g does not apply to them. If they happen to grab a few rounds that happen to be made outside of Texas however, they're screwed.
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  9. #48
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    Originally Posted by 230JHP
    When recidivism rates get low, I might start listening to the, ‘poor felons deserve to get their rights back,’ plea.

    But since recidivism rates are over 80%, I don’t have time for that.


    Quote Originally Posted by glenwolde View Post
    Many (myself included) would argue the current system of lifetime stigma is the very reason recidivism is so high. If the current system actually worked then recidivism would be low. It doesn't, and it isn't.

    From what I can find, I think his felony conviction was for marijuana. I have no sympathy for him, he chose to break the law. Even if I disagree with the law. Getting arrested isn't the same as getting convicted. We'll have to see what happens to him from here.
    Lifetime stigma is one thing. Not restoring rights is something else. It's a false correlation to say that because he had lost the right to vote and own a firearm, he was being stigmatized in all facets of his life.

    Restoring the right to own a gun or vote would not magically resolve the issues of employment, opportunity, public perception, etc.
    BigBlue likes this.
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  10. #49
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    Originally Posted by 230JHP
    When recidivism rates get low, I might start listening to the, ‘poor felons deserve to get their rights back,’ plea.

    But since recidivism rates are over 80%, I don’t have time for that.


    Quote Originally Posted by dwhite View Post
    This is really like the old joke:

    "The floggings will continue until morale improves".

    When they've lost the possibility of getting a REAL job and having a REAL life what are they expected to do.

    I knew of a company here in North Carolina that hired primarily convicted felons. Why? Because they could
    pay them peanut shells and treat them like dirt because they really didn't have anywhere else they could go.
    These guys were really little more than modern day slaves. It was some heavy, dirty, dangerous work they
    were doing. No one complained though. When it's ALL YOU HAVE you don't rock the boat.

    All the Best,
    D. White
    To the uncritical thought, it seems parallel. But it's a false analogy.

    'The floggings will continue until morale improves,' equates to the foolish idea that someone who isn't happy will learn to be happy if they are punished.

    If you're looking for a snappy cliche that applies, not restoring felons' rights is more akin to, 'You made your bed, now you have to lie in it.'

    Again, as I just pointed out -- restoring the rights in question is more a matter of protecting society from someone who has demonstrated they are willing to make bad choices. How society treats felons through work issues, etc. is a completely different knot to unravel.

    Letting someone own a gun isn't going to correct the way the company in North Carolina treated felons. Unless you are suggesting that it would be a good idea to let the employees have guns to solve the situation themselves.
    BigBlue likes this.
    Most stereotypes come from how you treated the last person who didn't know you.

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  11. #50
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    Regarding stigma and employment opportunity, I find it interesting there are so many people who want to force businesses to not be allowed to ask if one is a felon, yet if a business hires a violent felon and puts them with others and the felon goes "postal" on a co-worker, the business can be held liable for placing the violent felon among commoners.

    There's one way to avoid the stigma and social repercussions of being labeled a felon.

    I don't believe it is my government's responsibility to rehabilitate anyone (as if that even works). It is my government's responsibility to keep people off the streets that can't behave themselves.

 

 
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