Shooting Illustrated article on gun break in if needed
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    Shooting Illustrated article on gun break in if needed

    https://www.nramedia.org/t/11168994/123003131/97026/11/ This is an article from the NRA's magazine "Shooting Illustrated". The article has to do with gun break in or not.

    I will say I agree with the article for the most part. I do break in all of my pistols with at least 100-200 rounds. If no problems the gun goes into major use. For others of you things might well be different.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qwiks draw View Post
    https://www.nramedia.org/t/11168994/123003131/97026/11/ This is an article from the NRA's magazine "Shooting Illustrated". The article has to do with gun break in or not.

    I will say I agree with the article for the most part. I do break in all of my pistols with at least 100-200 rounds. If no problems the gun goes into major use. For others of you things might well be different.
    I've heard this too, that some guns need to be shot, "broken in", to smooth out internal parts that might be a little rough. I'm sure MIM parts are usually blamed for pre break in problems. I'm not a machinist so I don't really know but it makes sense. Like you I check the operation of a gun with a couple of hundred rounds or so just to make sure it will go bang.
    Qwiks draw likes this.

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    Notice from page 56 of a Kimber 1911 operation manual.

    Notice:

    Break-in Period. Before firing the firearm for the first time, fieldstrip and clean the firearm following proper procedures (see Disassembly, Cleaning and Lubrication and Assembly instructions in this manual).

    For proper break-in, fire 400-500 rounds of 230 grain (or heavier) full metal jacket,high quality factory-fresh premium personal defense ammunition.

    Clean and lubricate the firearm after every 100 rounds or after each shooting session, whichever is first, or more often as needed, such as when the firearm is exposed to dirt, moisture or perspiration.
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    Last edited by Lomax; 09-12-2019 at 07:22 AM. Reason: added pic
    "Anything that can happen with a gun probably will happen, sooner or later." _John M. Browning

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    If you are talking ARs, yes, they need to be run "wet" during break-in, and if I am doing any kind of extended firing they are run wet. There is just too much hot carbon gases being dumped into the action to run one dry.

    With pistols, there is no telling what kind of packing grease is in them for transport. Just cleaning and lubing them greatly improves their operation, and I would include revolvers in that group too.

    As far as the trigger, polishing just the shiny parts will knock a lot of rounds off that break-in period. Polishing the feed ramp almost always improves feeding.

    Production guns are production guns because they, the manufacturers, do not take the time and expense to finish many of the little things, that makes them cheaper. If you do those little things you can significantly improve your gun.
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    Auto pistol break-in is a real thing. I’ve observed it on numerous pistols. Once break-in is done the pistols smooth out nicely.
    Lomax and jtg452 like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenWolf70 View Post
    IJust cleaning and lubing them greatly improves their operation, and I would include revolvers in that group too.
    My most recent purchase is my Judge. Cleaning it produced a significant improvement in trigger smoothness. Dry firing a few hundred times made it even better. In fact, I'd say cleaning and breaking in did more for this revolver than any other firearm I've purchased in the last few years.

    I don't hold it against a manufacturer who recommends a break in period. In fact, I'd say it tells me they are honestly giving good advice.
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    I happen to agree with this article, but I think that the article needs forgets one thing I think is VERY valuable, especially if this is a new firearm in a caliber or style you are not familiar with.

    The one thing I will do with ANY firearm that I am not familiar with its action is to use light loads to start with, and then work my way up to stouter loads. For example, on a new 9mm that I bought, I started with some light loads, then slowly went to stouter and stouter loads, until I found my own and the firearms preferred load for accuracy and feel. For me, this took almost 500 rounds, and a few cleanings along the way, usually after a range session. I also got used to the slide, the magazine release, and just how the firearm in question worked.

    My revolvers are also "broke in" the same way with light loads, then stepped up to the stoutest load. With my .357 Magnums, I'll start with .38 Special wadcutters, then standard pressure loads, then +p loads, then into .357 Magnum loads, and begin the climb to stouter loads once again. I also get use to the different cylinder releases (Ruger vs Taurus vs Dan Wesson vs Colt), as this has A LOT to do with a quick reloading of the cylinder. I also determine if the standard grip is good or needs to be replaced, as well as clean the action when I get it. Just a cleaning and good inspection and oiling the trigger parts alone has done more to improve the trigger action than any spring work has ever done IMHO.

    With every firearm I have bought, I usually do this "get the feel of the firearm" drill. It usually takes, as the article mentioned, about 500 rounds to get to where I feel good with the firearm and the selection of ammunition for that particular firearm.
    Qwiks draw likes this.
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    Early in Glock’s business life there were a few mishaps which were user rated but Gaston told the marketing dept to recommend a break-in period in the owner’s manual. The marketeer told him they couldn’t do that because it violated Glock’s promise of “Glock; Perfection Out of The Box”.
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    You guys might want to check out this youtube video regarding this. I've followed this guy for guite some time and I believe he knows what he's talking about. He was an armor for Smith and Wesson and Ruger.

    Last edited by Safety64; 09-13-2019 at 01:05 AM.
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    AHHH-- Break In?? ar we talking about like where someone knocks down your door and tries to rob you??
    thtas the only break in that i am familiar with;
    signed " a CZ owner.
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