I got curious about frontier preservation of meat
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    I got curious about frontier preservation of meat

    The investigation of how long salted meat would keep in the era before refrigeration. I found this page that I thought was interesting.

    Preserving Meat on the Frontier: beef, mutton, ham, pork and eggs.
    “…democratic socialism, the great utopia of the last few generations, is not only unachievable but that to strive for it produces something utterly different – the very destruction of freedom itself. As has been aptly said: ‘What has always made the state a hell on earth has been precisely that man has tried to make it his heaven.'” F.A. Hayek

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    Pemmican was a Native American food that could last for years. Made from thin strips of jerked meat pounded to almost a powder, plus what ever berries that may be available, then mixed with melted tallow fat, this high energy food was an important food not only for the native americans but for fur trappers and explorers. Pemmican was so important that it was used as a trade good.
    Last edited by Bruntson; 11-30-2019 at 10:31 PM.

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    My father in law was born in 1921 on a Iowa farm, decades before refrigerators or even electricity came to most farms. He told stories of how they preserved pork as a kid. After butchering and cutting up a hog, they would half cook the meat and place a row of meat in a wooden barrel, then pour hot rendered hog fat over the row. Another row of meat was stacked on the first and hot fat would be poured in. They would repeat this process until the barrel was full and the wood lid put into place.

    When pork was needed, the lid was opened and the top layer of lard/fat scrapped off and the meat retrieved. Sometimes toward the end of the barrel the top of the lard might be a little rancid and it was discarded when the layer of meat retrieved.

    Back then, you ate breakfast after early morning chores like milking. Breakfast on a farm meant fresh WARM milk to drink. Milk was cooled by putting in a metal can and immersing in well water.
    Last edited by Bruntson; 11-30-2019 at 10:54 PM.

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    An interesting read. Reminds me of . . . . .

    . . . .. when I was growing up on the farm (this is Pure Appalachia, after all) , we butchered four hogs each year for our family - generally on Thanksgiving Friday. The uncles, aunts, and cousins all came over and we did it all.

    (Dad bought coarse salt in hundred-pound bags.) He used a different recipe, but "dry-cured" (like the Virginia-style) some hams, bacon, and shoulders, and "wet-cured" others before smoking - these were injected with a huge stainless-steel "syringe" before being brined, brine was then changed out after three or five days, then left nearly six weeks before smoking. Smoking usually began on New Years Day. Then, after smoking, the hams hung in the smokehouse until used.

    Sausage(raw sausage from the grinder) was mixed well with salt/saltpetre/cayenne/black pepper/brown sugar, packed into crocks and sealed with fresh lard poured over top. It kept well in the cool cellar until mid-summer, by which time it was eaten up, not because it went bad.

    In mid-summer, we started to eat a lot more poultry. You didn't need to preserve a chicken, you just chopped off its head an hour before dinner. We gathered eggs morning and evening, had one Jersey cow whose milk was higher butterfat than is allowable in any state today. Had all the butter and eggs we could eat and still supplied two aunts who lived in town.

    By the way, have you ever heard of "egg-keep"? Sodium silicate, "water glass" are a few more names for the same stuff. It will work.
    How to Store Fresh Eggs
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    As a little kid on our farm I remember our smoke house and the large salt bin. I only remember using them for pork but that was a long time ago. I always loved the smell when I would go in or around that old smoke house.

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    The mention of eggs brought this to mind. Europeans don't refrigerate eggs and in fact cannot. Germophobe USA peeps wash the cuticle off thus mandating the refrigeration.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/why-...ir-eggs-2018-4
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    “…democratic socialism, the great utopia of the last few generations, is not only unachievable but that to strive for it produces something utterly different – the very destruction of freedom itself. As has been aptly said: ‘What has always made the state a hell on earth has been precisely that man has tried to make it his heaven.'” F.A. Hayek

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    LOL, I spent 10 years off and on in Germany, and I never once knew anyone who didn't refrigerate their eggs. My mother in law was very old school, and she refrigerated her eggs. I don't know where this guy got his information.
    Battle of Wanat: 10 years ago last 13 July, 1LT Brostram was killed in combat killing the last enemy combatant in the outpost. The LT went to the point of decision and made the difference that turned the tide of the battle. The original investigation found the Bde Cmdr, the Bn Cmdr and the Co Cmdr at fault for dereliction of duty. If you want to see what a sarcastic silver star citation reads like, pull up the company commander's silver star.

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    As fresh beef steaks served even in fine restaurants, before refrigeration, would get a odor to them from spoilage, they weren't thrown out. Non tomato based Catsup sauce was used on the meat to mask the spoiled odor. The original catsup was mostly imported from the Orient. It was in the 1880's that Henry Heinz developed the tomato based "Ketchup" for the same reason. I dare say none of us don't love Ketchup, particularly on fried potatoes and a variety of other dishes.

    The History Channel had some great programs on "The Food that built America" last spring, and I found the stories extremely interesting. Henry Heinz was on the first program, as was Kellog, Post, Hersey and Birdseye. You should watch them.

    These are not currently available online, but may possibly found on demand. Here is a program advertisement.
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    When b o was in office, and leading up to hillarie's anticipated coronation, I became a prepper to an extent.

    I grew up with my mother canning vegatables and fruits from our garden and orchards, have a good sized pressure cooker and a lot of jars, make a lot of jerky and smoke a lot of meats, so meat and other edibles, prserving them is no big deal.

    I doubt at this age, I will get concerned, particularly if Trump wins 20-20 in a landslide.

    It is good for all of us to know how to do these things.

    Prior to the great depression, most of America was still on the farm, or in agrarian society, and people in town had gardens, chickens and a milk cow. My dad grew up in this era, and even milked a cow to pay for his room behind a house when he started at Texas Tech in 1939. People still had horses and buggies in the late 30's also. This is a large reason people survived the great depression, even in cities.

    Today, a finacial collapse as we had in 1929 would be utter chaos as very few people live on the land and are based in cities. Those near the cities on an acre or two of land with gardens would be overun by city dwellers.

    I actually enjoy my meager garden, would like a few chickens, but the wife draws the line at chickens
    "Color Me Proudly Deplorable!"

    "We the Government, By the Government, For the Government!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake3501 View Post
    When b o was in office, and leading up to hillarie's anticipated coronation, I became a prepper to an extent.

    I grew up with my mother canning vegatables and fruits from our garden and orchards, have a good sized pressure cooker and a lot of jars, make a lot of jerky and smoke a lot of meats, so meat and other edibles, prserving them is no big deal.

    I doubt at this age, I will get concerned, particularly if Trump wins 20-20 in a landslide.

    It is good for all of us to know how to do these things.

    Prior to the great depression, most of America was still on the farm, or in agrarian society, and people in town had gardens, chickens and a milk cow. My dad grew up in this era, and even milked a cow to pay for his room behind a house when he started at Texas Tech in 1939. People still had horses and buggies in the late 30's also. This is a large reason people survived the great depression, even in cities.

    Today, a finacial collapse as we had in 1929 would be utter chaos as very few people live on the land and are based in cities. Those near the cities on an acre or two of land with gardens would be overun by city dwellers.

    I actually enjoy my meager garden, would like a few chickens, but the wife draws the line at chickens
    This is why it is a good idea to have a gun.. Of course, no gun is going to save you from hundreds of hungry city-folk who are entitled to your meager supply of food.

    As far as chickens are concerned, maybe you should have a clarifying discussion with your wife. When you told her you wanted to bring a couple of chicks home, maybe she thought you meant something else!!
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