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  1. #11
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    Re: polishing internals on a revolver?

    Someone posted a tip on using toothpaste to polish up the internals
    We used to do the same thing years ago with valve grinding compound. Put some in the mechanism and close it up, dry fire it maybe 40-50 times, and then get it all out - it's pretty abrasive stuff. Used to call it a poor man's trigger job. That's not the best way to do it though - careful stoning and polishing of the proper surfaces is. Another thing that should be noted is that it isn't going to lighten the trigger much, but it will smooth it out (unless you change the geometry on the sear, which I don't recommend). If you really want a good trigger you usually have to respring too, and that's the thing that usually has the biggest impact on the pull weight. A little bit of polishing with 600 grit sandpaper and some lighter springs and you'll be amazed at the difference in the quality of your trigger. My $.02
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  2. #12
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    Re: polishing internals on a revolver?

    That's a good 2-cents worth db. Many other folks can too, but I can say that just a hammer spring change has worked wonders for all mine. The 9-pound has really improved pull in the center-fires and I even stuck a 11-pound (stock) hammer spring from the 327 in the 941. Not a single FTF on any of them yet.

    I really wish the Wolff trigger springs would slip in place and function, but they won't, at least they won't in mine anyway. Both the 9 and the 6.5 coil-bind before DA action cycles through. I realize it would not take much grinding on either trigger spring....I just hate to cut one up and I wish Wolff would produce a reduced spring that would slip right into these small frames.

  3. #13
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    Re: polishing internals on a revolver?

    The idea behind the toothpaste is that the mild abrasive in the paste will polish the points of contact between the sear & hammer, etc. The hot water would remove all the toothpaste since it is water soluble.

    Polishing compound would much better.

    Springs may lighten the trigger pull but will do nothing for rough surfaces.

    Stoning the surfaces would be best. I've done it on several S&W revolvers but have not tried it on a Taurus. The geometry is different between the two brands plus the trigger pull on my Tracker leaves little to be desired.

  4. #14
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    Re: polishing internals on a revolver?

    Quote Originally Posted by youngandfree
    Someone posted a tip on using toothpaste to polish up the internals and I can't find who posted it. My question is for clarification. You remove the sideplate and fill that up wit the toothpaste, not just under the grip, correct? I still have to get me some snap caps, so it might be a while before I get to do it.

    Thanks.
    I am the one that posted about using toothpaste to polish the action on a revolver. I have done it several times with good results on S&W revolvers. I have not done this with Taurus revolvers but it should work the same assuming that the internals are not too rough.

    Remove the side plate, wash out all of the lubricant using a solvent, fill it with toothpaste, replace the side plate, dry fire it about 100 times or so, remove the sideplate, rinse out ALL of the toothpaste and apply a coat of lubricant. If this does not slick it up you may need to take it to a gunsmith because the parts are too rough for this method.

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  5. #15
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    Re: polishing internals on a revolver?

    There are some useful videos on youtube showing how to stone the internals on revolvers. I followed the one for my S&W 642: removed the internal lock, stoned the friction points with a 600 India stone and replaced the hammer and trigger return spring with Wilson Combat lighter springs. Only took an hour and made the action much smoother and lighter. The video also showed what NOT to stone and why - good to know. Pretty easy if you take your time and follow the instructions exactly.

  6. #16
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    This may sound weird but i use a Lansky knife sharpening system. They come with assorted stone grits that you can do some hand tooling and polishing on assorted parts. Plus you get a decent knife sharpener.
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  7. #17
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    Don't forget to floss.
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  8. #18
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    Caution, polishing sear surfaces (trigger & hammer) should be left to a professional. I tried to smooth the trigger pull on my S&W 686 and ended up having to replace both the trigger and hammer. The sear sufaces would not hold the hammer when cocked for single action. (very dangerous) Wolff springs helped to lighten the pull and lots of dry firing and actual range time smoothed the action.

  9. #19
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    I would worry too much about packing anything in there might get at the single action shelf and maybe round it down. The last think you need it to add push off into your revolver.

  10. #20
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    Good grief, you guys.
    I saw Larry Potterfield's videos on You tube that show show just what, where and how to shine the interior of a pistol. (He's the owner of MidwayUSA.) I looked at the titles of about 150 of his videos and didn't find it. Sigh.
    I remember shining up, under and on the return bar and anywhere something rubs on something. But not any part of the sear or trigger. That's above my pay grade. Oil every pivot and sliding part. Dry fire. Go shoot. It all gets better. Has for me.
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